Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.repositorio.ufop.br/handle/123456789/8018
Title: Swim training does not protect mice from skeletal muscle oxidative damage following a maximum exercise test.
Authors: Barreto, Tatiane Oliveira
Cleto, Lorena Sabino
Gioda, Carolina Rosa
Silva, Renata Sabino da
Azevedo, Ana Carolina Campi
Franco, Junia de Sousa
Magalhães, José Carlos de
Penaforte, Claudia Lopes
Pinto, Kelerson Mauro de Castro
Cruz, Jader dos Santos
Vieira, Etel Rocha
Keywords: Swim
Oxidative stress
Superoxide dismutase
Catalase
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: BARRETO, T. O. et al. Swim training does not protect mice from skeletal muscle oxidative damage following a maximum exercise test. European Journal of Applied Physiology, v. 112, p. 2523–2530, 2011. Disponível em:<https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-011-2211-x> . Acesso em: 16 jun. 2017.
Abstract: We investigated whether swim training protects skeletal muscle from oxidative damage in response to a maximum progressive exercise. First, we investigated the effect of swim training on the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in the gastrocnemius muscle of C57Bl/6 mice, 48 h after the last training session. Mice swam for 90 min, twice a day, for 5 weeks at 31C (±1C). The activities of SOD and CAT were increased in trained mice (P\0.05) compared to untrained group. However, no effect of training was observed in the activity of GPx. In a second experiment, trained and untrained mice were submitted to a maximum progressive swim test. Compared to control mice (untrained, not acutely exercised), malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were increased in the skeletal muscle of both trained and untrained mice after maximum swim. The activity of GPx was increased in the skeletal muscle of both trained and untrained mice, while SOD activity was increased only in trained mice after maximum swimming. CAT activity was increased only in the untrained compared to the control group. Although the trained mice showed increased activity of citrate synthase in skeletal muscle, swim performance was not different compared to untrained mice. Our results show an imbalance in the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx in response to swim training, which could account for the oxidative damage observed in the skeletal muscle of trained mice in response to maximum swim, resulting in the absence of improved exercise performance.
URI: http://www.repositorio.ufop.br/handle/123456789/8018
metadata.dc.identifier.uri2: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-011-2211-x
ISSN: 14396327
Appears in Collections:DEEFD - Artigos publicados em periódicos

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