Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.repositorio.ufop.br/handle/123456789/11118
Title: Early-life nutritional status and metabolic syndrome : gender-specific associations from a cross-sectional analysis of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).
Authors: Briskiewicz, Bruna Lucas
Barreto, Sandhi Maria
Amaral, Joana Ferreira do
Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander
Molina, Maria del Carmen Bisi
Matos, Sheila Maria Alvim de
Cardoso, Letícia de Oliveira
Velásquez Meléndez, Jorge Gustavo
Schmidt, Maria Inês
Gonçalves, Luana Giatti
Keywords: Birth weight
Leg length
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: BRISKIEWICZ, B. L. et al. Early-life nutritional status and metabolic syndrome : gender-specific associations from a cross-sectional analysis of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Public Health Nutrition, v. 21, n. 8, p. 1546–1553, jun. 2018. Disponível em: <https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/earlylife-nutritional-status-and-metabolic-syndrome-genderspecific-associations-from-a-crosssectional-analysis-of-the-brazilian-longitudinal-study-of-adult-health-elsabrasil/F640640B7043802774AD402EAC9665FD>. Acesso em: 7 mar. 2019.
Abstract: Objective: In the present study we investigated gender-specific associations of low birth weight (LBW) and shorter relative leg length with metabolic syndrome (MetS) after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health-related behaviours. We also investigated whether these associations are independent of age at menarche and BMI at 20 years old. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Subjects: Baseline data from 12 602 participants (35–74 years) of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), 2008–2010. Setting: MetS was defined according to the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. LBW (<2·5 kg) and age- and sex-standardized relative leg length (high, medium and low) were the explanatory variables studied. The strength of the associations between the explanatory variables and MetS was estimated by Poisson regression with robust variance. Results: MetS prevalence was 34·2 %; it was more prevalent in men (36·8 %) than in women (32·2 %). In multivariate analysis, LBW was associated (prevalence ratio; 95 % CI) with MetS only in women (1·28; 1·24, 1·45). Shorter leg length was associated with MetS in both men (1·21; 1·09, 1·35 and 1·46; 1·29, 1·65 for low and medium lengths, respectively) and women (1·12; 1·00, 1·25 and 1·40; 1·22, 1·59 for low and medium lengths, respectively). Additional adjustments for age at menarche and BMI at 20 years old did not change the associations. Conclusions: Poor nutritional status as estimated by LBW and lower leg length in childhood was associated with a higher prevalence of MetS, although LBW was a significant factor only among women.
URI: http://www.repositorio.ufop.br/handle/123456789/11118
metadata.dc.identifier.uri2: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/earlylife-nutritional-status-and-metabolic-syndrome-genderspecific-associations-from-a-crosssectional-analysis-of-the-brazilian-longitudinal-study-of-adult-health-elsabrasil/F640640B7043802774AD402EAC9665FD
ISSN: 1475-2727
Appears in Collections:DENCS - Artigos publicados em periódicos

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